My Favorite Lots from Today’s Christie’s NYC Auction

Lot #26 – Universal Genève Gold Chronograph Retailed by Hermès

Universal Genève was known as a brand that created groundbreaking designs in the early 20th century. In 1935, the Compax was introduced and it was the first chronograph wristwatch to display both hour & minute registers. Hermès was one of the first retailers to carry the Universal Genève Compax in Europe but the partnership was short-lived, so not many of these co-branded pieces have survived. This example is from 1936 and has an outer track tachometer in blue and telemeter in red, very large registers, original crown and even the original box! What’s appealing about this piece, besides all the aforementioned, are the thick, faceted, down-turned lugs that make this 34-mm case wearable and look not at all too small. Wind added that very few UG co-branded Hermès pieces come to market – maybe under 10 in total and that this is the only known Universal Genève Chronograph seen at auction to bear the Hermès signature in the early script on the dial, a true rarity! Estimate is $15k – $25k.

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Lot #37 – Rolex Submariner 6538 – James Bond

This example is from 1957 and what’s most incredible is that it is in original condition. The original bevels on the lugs are untouched and the case has never been polished; no service marks on the inside of the caseback, it has the original bezel insert, and the bezel itself in great condition! The allure that draws collectors is the fact that this was the best fashion swiss watch online that Sean Connery’s James Bond wore in Dr. No. The large crown without crown guards and the gilt four-line dial (four lines of text on the dial) is what makes this a grand slam. Enthusiastically, Wind expressed that this was his favorite lot of the auction and calls the timepiece a “true survivor.” He also added that the last similar 6538, a slightly younger edition and with a tropical dial, sold in May 2013 in Geneva for $544,000, and that this example is one of the best Submariners to ever come to market. Estimate is $60k-$100k.

Lot 51 – Patek Philippe Ref. 1461 in Stainless Steel

This example features even numerals on the dial and an engine turned subdial at 6 o’clock to display the constant seconds. At 32 mm, it’s on the smaller side of the men’s vintage watch size spectrum but it actually looks a lot better on the wrist than you’d expect. The tear drop (or what Wind calls “the crab-claw”) lugs give the timepiece the illusion that it is larger, so it wears very well. The 1461 appears to be all original and it’s in great condition, which is fantastic for a steel Patek from 1945. This was produced near the end of WWII and at that time precious metals were valuable commodities during the war, so Patek made more watches in steel. Wind emphasized that any steel Pateks are a very special thing and this example is a great formal Patek that contains history at an accessible price point in a timepiece that is extremely rare. Estimate is $8-$12k.

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Lot #81- Vacheron Constantin Single Button Chronograph

One of the most rare and historically important pieces of this auction is this single-button gold chronograph from 1927 that was originally owned by Alexander I, King of Yugoslavia. This example has a white enamel dial that is impeccable; very little wear on the case; Breguet style, black enameled numerals; blued steel hands for both center & registers; and the crest of the king of Yugoslavia engraved on the caseback. Alexander I went to school in Geneva, which might be the reason he collected fine timepieces. Wind claims this rarity looks all original and that “it’s amazing to see a chrono from the late 1920 that still looks so modern.” Estimate is $40k- $60k.

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Lot #45 – Patek Philippe 130 Retailed by Tiffany & Company.

There are several reasons why this example of the yellow-gold chronograph (Ref. 130) is my favorite lot of this auction. Let’s begin with the very unusual spade-shaped hour hand and the minute hand that is referred to as lapidated; the Breguet numerals that were popular for the U.S. market; the great condition of the case; the rarity of being co-branded by the oldest Patek Philippe retailer in North America; and my favorite attribute, the large registers. The oversized registers make this 33-mm chronograph appear larger and bolder than all of its sister examples of the Reference 130, not to mention the registers were most likely a special request by an avid sailor for the ease of maritime-related timekeeping, which makes sense with the engraving on the side of the case and caseback. It reads, “The Point, Great Neck, Long Island” as well as the initials “R.B.C. June 27th 1941″ and a hand holding a scroll coming out of a lighthouse on the caseback. The uncommon engraving on the side of the case is the accretion that makes this example one of a kind and combined with all of the other facets, a gem in my eyes. Estimate is $60-$80k.

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A Great Deal

There are 265 lots in this season’s Christie’s Important Watches sale and we couldn’t cover all of them, but even though I chose five lots that might not have appealed to you, you should know that there are watches from all over the spectrum up for grabs. From a set of four vintage tag heuer replica watches estimated at $1,500 – $2k (Lot #148) to under-priced tourbillons, modern watches at a bargain, historically important books, and even enameled pocketwatches older than your grandfather. Below is a list of some of the best deals, in my humble opinion. Enjoy!

Lot #9 – IWC Pilot Doppelchronograph, Ref. 3717 – Double chronographs, or rattrapantes, are always produced in limited quantities, regardless of the brand, because of how complex they are to manufacture. This one is priced below most regular chronos! Estimate of $4-$6k.

Lot #11 – IWC Minute Repeater – Probably one of the best deals in the entire auction, Grand Complications from such reputable Swiss manufactures usually begin in the six digits. Estimate of $25-$30k.

Lot #101 – J. Petit & Frères Gold and Enamel Quarter Repeating Pocket Watch – Have you ever wanted a watch that could mechanically chime the time? This may not produce sounds down to the minute but can still do the hours and quarters and has an enamel detailed portrait on the back that certainly took ages to complete – for less than that Omega you’ve been eyeing. Estimate $1,500 – $2k.

Lot #198 – Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore Diver – Barely four years old and estimated at a third of the retail, buying modern at auction could be the best deal if this is something you’ve been looking for. Estimate $6-$8k.

Lot #139 – Patek Philippe 5000G – A limited edition Patek in a precious metal (white gold) in the four digits is a bargain, especially to be part of the small, exclusive club of Patek owners. Estimate $7-$9k.

Lot 212 – Rolex 5513 – A classic and staple in every watch collector’s arsenal, you don’t have to spend five digits to own a vintage Rolex. Not only is this a no-date Submariner but this piece is actually sought after since it’s a “meters first” model.

What Makes a Dive Replica Watch a Dive Watch?

One leading source offers a definitive answer to the question of what determines whether a timepiece can legitimately called a “dive watch” or “divers’ watch” in this article. 

In the best fashion swiss replica watch world, when we ask “What is a … ?”, the search for the answer often begins with one source: Berner’s Illustrated Professional Dictionary of Horology, and that’s where today’s lesson begins. Berner’s defines “diving watch” as a “watch designed to withstand immersion to a depth of at least 100 m and to satisfy requirements specified in ISO standard 6425.” So, there’s your answer. If it is not certified under ISO 6425, it isn’t a dive watch. That was easy. Or maybe not. The problem is that very few so-called dive watches are claimed to satisfy all of the ISO 6425 standards. Where does that leave us? Are there only a handful of real dive watches in the world?

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Without doubt, the waters surrounding the question of what it takes to make a “true dive watch” are deep and murky. Our goal today is not to settle that debate (as if we could). For this exercise, we will also ignore dive computers, the acknowledgement of which would end this article right about here. We will also leave aside watches intended for diving with mixed gas. Rather, we’ll take a look at what the ISO thinks it takes to make a dive watch. The standards may raise some issues you have not previously considered. Once you know what’s what, you can decide for yourself what it takes to make a dive watch, and whether you need one that is ISO certified. ISO 6425 has been around in its current form since 1996. Given the popularity of dive watches, you would think the standards would be well known among watch enthusiasts, but they are not, probably because they are not as widely used as COSC’s chronometer standards. They are also rather long, a bit technical, and rarely reprinted in full. The meat of the official guidelines is found in sections 6 and 7. These spell out the physical requirements for dive watches and the methods for testing them.

The watch must be equipped with a device that allows the user to pre-select a period of time of up to 60 minutes. This may be a rotating bezel or a digital display. The device must be protected from inadvertent manipulation. A bezel must have a scale showing 60 minutes with markings showing every 5 minutes. Markings on the dial must be coordinated with those on the pre-selecting device, and must be clearly visible. The time must also be clearly visible, and the minutes hand must be clearly distinguishable from the hour hand. (“Clearly” is a favorite ISO word.) The time set on the pre-selecting device must be clear, as must an indication that the watch is running. On analog watches, this is usually satisfied by placing luminous material on the seconds hand. Finally, battery-powered watches must have a visible low-battery indicator. Each of these must be visible at 25 cm, or about 10 inches, in the dark. There are also requirements governing salt-water resistance and reliability under water. The “resistance to salt water” test requires that the watch be placed in a sodium chloride solution of 30 grams per liter, which is about the same as seawater, and kept there for 24 hours at 18 to 25 degrees C, or about 64 to 77 degrees F. After the test, the case and accessories are inspected for changes (such as oxidation) and moving parts are tested to make sure they still function properly.

Calibre de Cartier Diver Steel (BACK)

The “reliability under water” test calls for the watch to be immersed in about 12 inches of water (not salt water) for 50 hours, again at 64 to 77 degrees F, after which the watch is examined for correct function. (Note that this is not the water-resistance test – that is discussed below). Both before and after the “reliability under water” test, the watch is subjected to a condensation test to determine whether any moisture has penetrated the case. The watch is placed on a plate and heated to between 40 and 45 degrees C, or about 104 to 113 degrees F. When the watch reaches the temperature of the plate, a drop of water at 64 to 77 degrees F is placed on the crystal. After one minute, the crystal is wiped off, and any watch with condensation on the inside of the crystal fails the test, as this result indicates a leak.

ISO 6425 incorporates both ISO 764, which governs antimagnetic timepieces, and ISO 1413, which covers shock resistance. ISO 764 requires that a watch be placed in a magnetic field of 4,800 amperes along three different axes for 1 minute each and maintain its accuracy to within +/-30 seconds per day as measured before and after the test. So, for example, if the watch was +12 seconds per day before the test and +40 seconds after, it would pass.

The shock-resistance standard is intended to simulate the shock a watch receives if it is dropped from a height of one meter onto a hardwood floor. The test involves delivering two shocks – one to the 9 o’clock side of the case and one to the top or face of the tag heuer swiss replica watch. The shock is delivered by what looks like a croquet mallet suspended between vertical supports so that it swings like a pendulum. Between the supports, at the bottom, is what looks like a large, rubber golf tee. The mallet, which has a plastic head weighing 3 kg or about 6.6 pounds, is raised to a height of one meter and released. The head hits the watch, which sits on the rubber tee, at a speed of 4.43 meters per second, delivering a shock equal to about 5,000 Gs. To meet the ISO standard, after the test the watch must keep time to within +/-60 seconds per day, compared with its rate before the test.

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The next requirements deal with resistance to external forces. The first test applies to the spring bars. With the strap closed, the inside of the strap is subjected to an outward force equal to 200 newtons in each direction. This subjects each spring bar to about 45 pounds of force. To make sure the crown and any other setting devices don’t leak, the watch is subjected to 125 percent of its rated depth pressure for 10 minutes while a force of five newtons, or a little over one pound, is applied to the top of the crown. Both before and after this test, the “hot-plate condensation test” described earlier is carried out to ensure that there is no leak. Note that the ISO guidelines do not explicitly require a screw-down crown. Any construction that passes the test is acceptable.

The next requirement is resistance to thermal shock. The watch is immersed in hot water (104 degrees F), then cool water (41 degrees F), then hot water again. The watch spends 10 minutes at each temperature, and the transition time from one temperature to the other cannot exceed 1 minute.  Both before and after the three immersions, the hot-plate condensation test is applied to make sure no moisture has entered the watch. The final test is water resistance at overpressure equal to 125 percent of the rated depth. The hot-plate condensation test is performed at the beginning to confirm that there is no moisture in the watch. The watch is then immersed in a pressure tester and, within 1 minute, pressure equal to 125 percent of the rated depth is applied. After two hours, the watch is quickly depressurized by reducing the pressure to 0.3 bar, or three meters, within 1 minute, and pressure is maintained at that level for one hour. The watch is removed and dried, and the hot-plate condensation test is performed again.

Edox Hydro Sub “North Pole” Limited Edition

To meet the ISO 6425 guideline, this overpressure test must be performed on every watch. The other tests can be satisfied by testing a statistically significant sample of watches. This is an important difference compared with the less-stringent ISO 2281, used for watches that are merely “water resistant.” That ISO guideline does not require testing every watch to its rated depth, but only a sample. The next time you see an account of a watch rated to 100, 200 or even 300 meters failing at lesser depths, pay attention to whether the discount fake watch is an ISO 6425 diver or an ISO 2281 water-resistant model. Finally, the ISO standards include an optional test for air-tightness at an overpressure. The watch is subject to air pressure of two bar, or about 29 psi, and the flow of air entering the watch is measured. Comparable methods, for example using inert gasses, are permitted. The standard states, a bit vaguely, that “watches giving a high flow of air shall be eliminated from the test immediately.”

The ISO standards provide that a watch that passes all of the tests may be marked with the word “Divers” followed by the depth rating, for example “Divers 300m” (or similar terms in other languages). Watches that have not passed the ISO test may not be marked “Divers.” Note that the manufacturer is not required to put any specific mark or language on the watch to indicate that it satisfies ISO 6425.

Factory To The Gdr Time

Over 120 guests, among them many witnesses, accepted the invitation of the foundation “the german best fashion swiss replica watch museum glassworks, nicolas g. hayek” opening exhibition „glashütte to gdr time last friday, 12. june 2015. markus dreßler, mayor of the city of factory, and frank kittel, managing director of factory original, welcomed all those present with a short speech. then invited reinhard reichel, director of the german uhrenmuseums glassworks, the guests to the exhibition to explore.

Bürgermeister Markus Dreßler, Museumsdirektor Reinhard Reichel und Glashütte Original Geschäftsführer  Frank Kittel auf dem Ballon, geschmückt mit dem alten GUB-Logo.

With this exhibition appreciates the german watch museum glass factory, 25 years after the reunification of the benefits of the glashütter designers, a toolmaker and precision mechanic. these people succeeded, despite often difficult circumstances at that time, the tradition of watchmaking in the gdr time to receive.

Der Museumsdirektor Reinhard Reichel lädt die Gäste ein, die Ausstellung zu besuchen. Viele Zeugnisse aus der Zeit wurden liebevoll zusammen getragen.

 With the establishment of the state-owned enterprise glashütter uhrenbetriebe, veb aocs, began on 1. july 1951, a new period in the history of the glashütter watchmaking. the company made numerous products in the daily life and science have been used. the exhibition shows how diverse the range of products: tag heuer replica watches, marine chronometer, special machines, wall – and time. the veb glashütter uhrenbetriebe developed by 1990, the largest employer in the region. for this reason, he held many tasks, on the production of clocks and watches beyond: the education and training of talented people and a variety of leisure activities in the former german democratic republic, also in the exhibition highlights. the museum displays, with a selection of the production of watches tools, machinery, materials, drawings and a variety of photographs. advertisements and brochures to illustrate aspects of sales and marketing. the exhibition is up to 1. german watch museum in november 2015 year experience. a companion volume to the exhibition in german and english for 6.50 euros can be purchased at the museum shop.

Summer Special: Swiss Classic Replica Watch

Sun’s out guns out! Yes, it’s June and that means that people are giving serious thought to where they will spend their vacation. For most, this entails some sort of beach setting and may include activities in the water such as swimming, diving, sailing or surfing. If not, though, the vacation usually involves some sort of travel and often to a foreign land. This is where, if you like watch forums, things get entertaining.

So, if you’re a forum reader, especially on a forum that focuses on more expensive brands, we are now entering the season of the infamous, “Is it safe to wear my insert classic replica watch brand and model to insert destination” threads. The threads often ask about South American locales where eagle-eyed squadrons of motorcycle gangs apparently roam the streets poised and ready to forcefully pilfer your Rolex with nary a thought about your life’s worth. Amazingly, as our news media becomes increasingly sensational, I see questions from quaking travelers asking about bucolic places in America because, as you know, the entirety of America carries assault rifles and apparently mows down all comers at merely the suggestion of a wrongful glance. Ok, so I am being overly harsh, as people honestly do want to know about safety. You love your watches and want to bring them with but you also desire some reassurance.

So, if safety is a concern, a messy or rugged environment is on the docket, or, perhaps, you’re not used to traveling and may be the type of person who is prone to leaving their watch lying around in a hotel room while stepping out, what’s an inexpensive and durable, yet credible (read: mechanical) watch to bring on your journey? Well, we’re glad you asked because knowing us here at Fratellowatches, we have a couple ideas for you. One watch is immensely popular while the other is slightly more reclusive, but no less compelling. Let’s have ourselves a little Summer competition between two solid, ISO-rated choices: the Seiko SKX007 Diver and the Citizen Promaster NY0040.

Seiko and Citizen are two Japanese watch companies that have been duking it out for decades. Both offer watches at all sorts of price ranges but really bring in revenue through production of moderately inexpensive, yet high quality, timepieces. Impressively, each company manufactures in-house movements and most of its own parts. Due to economic pressures, both now utilize factories throughout Asia instead of solely relying on Japan, but I’ve never been able to tell the difference quality-wise no matter where the pieces are made. Seiko and Citizen are famous in many sub-genres of watches, but both have really done well when it comes to their divers. Here again, the two make dive watches with a wide range of pricing and functionality and are revered by both professional and recreational divers.

Seiko SKX007 vs Citizen NY0040: An Introduction

The Seiko SKX007 has been around since 1996 and is the latest in a long line of robust Seiko divers. It followed the successful 7002 diver, which actually followed the absolutely famous 6309 divers. Whereas the 7002 had a very similar case design as today’s SKX007, it only contained a day display versus the day/date found on today’s model. The SKX007 contains many of the traits found in Seiko’s earliest divers, some of which we will discuss later, and, therefore, exhibits a strong sense of lineage. The bottom line is that this is a common watch for vintage Seiko lovers to own and, in fact, was one of my earliest Seiko purchases.

The Citizen Promaster NY0040 was introduced in 1997. I’ll be honest that I do not see a direct predecessor to this watch, but Citizen had clearly started down a far more revolutionary path in the 1980’s versus its Japanese competitor. Promasters often fused digital displays with analog while embracing quartz and eco-drive technology to create some interesting designs during the period. Still, though, the NY0040 contains a classic automatic movement and has certainly been produced for long enough to earn classic status in its own rite. Evidence of such status is its frequent use by military divers.

The Specs

The Seiko SKX007 contains a 42.5mm stainless case with 22mm lugs and is water resistant to 200m. It has a 120-click unidirectional bezel that sits on top of the case. The crystal is a flat Hardlex mineral glass. It has a screw down case back and crown. Inside of the luxury replica watch online is the Seiko 7s26 automatic with 21 jewels and a 21,600 bph frequency. The movement contains a day and date function, is non-hacking, and cannot be hand wound due to the employment of Seiko’s Magic Lever. The crown sits in a Seiko-familiar 4:00 position.

The Citizen NY0040 is equipped with a 42mm stainless case with 20mm lugs and is also water resistant to 200m. It has a 60-click unidirectional bezel that sports a diameter equal to that of the case below it. Like the Seiko, Citizen uses a mineral glass for its crystal. The Citizen uses its in-house Miyota 8200 movement with 21 jewels and 21,600 bph frequency. Here again, it’s similar to the Seiko with a day and date function, but it strays in that it can be hand wound. Also, oddly, the crown sits at 8:00. It should be known that most find the Citizen movement to be more accurate than the Seiko.

The Aesthetics

Both of these watches are purposeful-looking dive watches that seem prepared to take a beating. They both have solid lugs, crown guards and bulky bezels. Dial-wise, though, they take different paths.

The Seiko SKX007 makes do with the bare minimum of details on its dial. It uses printed hour markers and has a matte finish. The day/date window is beveled but contains no surround. The only hint of color, in fact, is the red verbiage stating the water resistance. As mentioned, it’s a design that Seiko lovers will be familiar with and aside from the crown position it wouldn’t look out of place on the wrist of someone who is interested in, say, the Rolex Submariner. The SKX007 contains hands that are similar to far more expensive Prospex pieces and it also exhibits the familiar “tsunami” motif on its screw down case back. It’s finished well from a dial, case and bezel perspective and certainly could battle watches costing twice the price. Regarding the case, it’s nicely brushed on the top surface and polished to a mirror shine on the sides. The screw-down crown is unsigned as is the typical Seiko way and nestles flush with the crown guards. Furthermore, luminescence is a seriously strong suit.

Regarding weaknesses of the SKX007, I dislike how the dial is a crisp white and the hands are off-white. To some, it may appear like patina, but I find it a little cheesy. Also, I see a small gap between the day and date wheel, which is not typical for Seiko. Aside from that, my only other general wish is for a hand-winding movement, but because this is Seiko, I can’t be too surprised that the watch is sold without one.

Whereas the Seiko SKX007 is a very simple piece, the Citizen NY0040 contains a lot more detail. First off, the dial is glossy and contains applied indices. The hands are similarly shaped to the Seiko but match the dial perfectly. Color, while also sparse, also comes in the form of red with the mention of water resistance on the lower half and Citizen’s trademark Promaster arrow on the upper half. It’s a high quality dial that even adds the nicety such as a day/date bezel surround. The bezel on the NY0040 is quite a bit different than the SKX007 in that it is 60-click instead of the Seiko’s 120 and it is also rounded at top versus angling inwards in the case of the Seiko. It’s knurled between the 10-minute marks and, as mentioned, follows the diameter of the case. Regarding the case, it is polished on the sides and matte on the top. The unsigned crown contains thick ridges and screws down but still protrudes far beyond the crown guards.   The case back contains the Citizen Promaster arrow.

If we speak about drawbacks to the NY0040, I’d say that it looks a little less timeless due to the amount of detailing. On the other hand, for the most part, those details are managed well and to a very high standard well beyond its price. Oddly, like the Seiko, this piece contains a big gap between its day and date wheels. Finally, the crown position makes this tag heuer replica watch unique but it is a little awkward to use unless, perhaps, you’re left-handed.

On the Wrist

Let’s get this out of the way; both the Seiko SKX007 and Citizen NY0040 are good looking watches on the wrist. They are weighty and feel extremely solid. Both have presence but are extremely comfortable due to their median size. Speaking of size, while both are similar on paper, they certainly wear differently.

The SKX007 wears a bit bigger due to its bezel shape and what at least appears to be a larger diameter dial. A fat crown, wider and longer lugs, further augments this size advantage. When I say that it wears longer, one curious thing is that the right side above the crown really seems to lengthen the appearance of the watch if that makes sense. It almost wears thin but long. Also, it does sit reasonably tall due to a thick case and bezel. In any case, it’s a nice wearing watch but it certainly doesn’t wear as large as vintage Seiko’s such as the famous 6309. Bezel action is really nice with little slop. Using the crown is also a nice experience due to its large diameter.

You’ll see that I’ve paired the SKX007 with a gray NATO strap. Due to my small wrists and the fact that I don’t really care for Seiko’s stock rubber strap, I went for this look. The rubber strap is well-liked by many, but to me, it’s just too thick, stiff, and lengthy. The SKX007 is available with a jubilee style bracelet for little extra expense and might not be a terrible idea to pick up if you like the option. Lastly, it is available as the SKX009 with a red and blue bezel if the “Pepsi” look is of interest.

The Citizen NY0040 is another great wearing watch that wears smaller than the Seiko. The smaller lug width and length of said lugs along with a smaller crown are the main contributors to this look as well as a bezel that rounds inwards towards the dial. However, the NY0040 wears “more round” due to its short lugs and case-hugging bezel. It’s also not as tall as the Seiko, which gives it a more compact look. The bezel action is nowhere as smooth as the Seiko due to its 60 clicks, but it’s still not bad. Crown action and winding are nice. As mentioned, I like a bigger crown but this does have good tactile feel and I do like the finishing. Luminescence on the NY0040 is also quite good, but perhaps not quite as strong as the Seiko’s.

Here again, I’ve paired the Citizen with a NATO strap. This one is admittedly brighter than what I paired with the SKX007 but I think that augments the glossy dial and greener lume plots. I’ve seen Citizens on bracelets and it looks great but I cannot speak to their quality. This discount fake watch online came with a slightly more flexible rubber strap that is still too long for me. Also, I know it’s Citizen tradition, but I don’t love the decompression tables printed on the side of the strap. One nice thing about the NY0040 is that they are available in several dial colors along with black such as cream, blue and yellow.

Buying Advice and Conclusions

We mentioned in the beginning of our article that both of these watches are affordable. You can find either for under $200, brand new, all day long on sites like Amazon or eBay. They retail for far more but are discounted heavily. For some reason, it seems as though the NY0040 is less available from US-based sellers but it is easily imported. This price, to me, just feels like a no-brainer.

Both the Seiko SKX007 and Citizen NY0040 represent great value for the capabilities they possess. Plus, you get a watch that can be worn every day no matter the activity. Both are credible ISO-rated dive watches and you certainly do not have to worry about them no matter where you decide to travel on holiday. Oh, and they can withstand a beating be it during a hike or a margarita-induced thwack against the side of the pool!

In the beginning of the article I mentioned that this was a competition and I suppose that means I need to choose a winner. There’s no doubt that’s a tough decision as both watches are great looking, boast similar features and build quality, and are priced similarly. If you’ve read articles by me, you’ll assume right off the bat that the Seiko is the clear winner due to my affection for the brand and also due to the fact that I collect vintage Seiko divers. This is a great argument, but honestly, if forced to choose, I’d probably pocket the Citizen. There’s just something about it that I like. I love the simplicity of the SKX007 but I like the details on the NY0040 even more. To me, the Citizen feels like a slightly more expensive watch due to its finishing and hand-winding movement. Plus, it fits me a bit better but that is completely down to genetics. In the end, though, one could not go wrong with either as a great every day watch that can be mixed and matched with so many strap options, or as a great vacation watch.

Fratello Watches Talks To Mr Hattori, CEO of Seiko

Since last year, Fratello Watches started to do more coverage on (Grand) Seiko watches. As we realized there is – besides an ever increasing demand from markets outside Japan – a lot of pride and craftsmanship in their Grand Seiko fashion swiss replica watches and due to the fact that Seiko has an incredible history on watches, we decided to finally give them the attention they deserve.

During BaselWorld 2015, Fratello Watches sat down with Mr. Hattori, the CEO of Seiko. A wonderful opportunity for us to see if we can get a glimpse of what’s happening at Seiko and to ask him to explain a number of things to us regarding the Seiko collections. We felt honoured that Mr. Hattori was willing to do the interview and learnt during our talk that he is not only the CEO of Seiko, but also IS Seiko. Together with a (quite large) team from Japan, we had our talk in the beautiful Seiko booth in BaselWorld.

Mr. Hattori, CEO of Seiko

FW:  In January 2015, the artificial conversation rate between Swiss Franc and Euro was disconnected by the Swiss National Bank and watches suddenly became much more expensive in European countries that use the Euro currency. Did this have any effect on the interest in Seiko watches from these Euro countries? Do the always-increasing Swiss watch prices have a positive effect on Seiko in general?

Mr. Hattori: We didn’t measure the impact of this yet. We always try to have stable prices for our watches, even though the Yen is weaker than the US dollar and Euro. We do feel the effect of the price increases on Swiss timepieces in Japan already, where Seiko gained a higher share on the (watch)market.

FW: Will Seiko plan to offer more Japan Domestic Model-only watches globally through official retailers and Seiko boutiques instead of having buyers/Seiko-fans needing to go through other channels?

Mr. Hattori: Due to the internet (=transparency) and the efforts of Seiko we clearly see the demand for these JDM watches. We were actually surprised that the demand is so huge for these models, outside Japan. We already started the harmonizing process with our Grand Seiko, Prospex and Astron collections. In the long-term, we would like to have a global Seiko collection. This would also be more efficient in terms of production and logistics.

FW: For such a large brand, Seiko has an incredible passionate fan-base among serious discount fake watches online collectors and enthusiasts who love the history of the brand.  Does Seiko have any plans to become closer with its fan base?

Mr. Hattori: We truly value our fan base. We want to keep our fans informed by using special websites, like the ones we did for the Prospex collection and our Virtual Seiko Museum. Also, we are inviting more people to Japan these days to have a look at Seiko.

FW: Last year during an interview with you, I read that the Grand Seiko will be marketed in more countries. What is the status of introducing the Grand Seiko to a wider audience? Will they also become more present at authorized dealers? (versus Seiko boutiques)?

Mr. Hattori: The introduction of the Grand Seiko collection is going very well for us. We see double-digit growth every single year for Grand Seiko. Our aim is to expand distribution of the Grand Seiko through boutiques and authorized dealers (100 partners in 20 countries). I would like to stress that our strategy regarding Seiko boutiques is not to replace the authorized dealer. They have a different role. A very important role of the Seiko boutiques is to increase the brand awareness and not only to do sales. The boutiques are used to tell the story about (Grand) Seiko using a bigger variety of watches (where authorized dealers only carry part of the collection) and some times carry specialities, like the JDM collection. For instance, we used the Seiko boutique in Paris to showcase some of our Credor timepieces.

FW: Can you give us your personal all-time favorite Top 3 of  historic Seiko watch models and your favorites of the current collection?

Mr. Hattori: Yes, my favorite Seiko watches from the past are the first Grand Seiko from 1960, the Seiko quartz Astron from 1969 (the world’s first quartz watch) and the first divers watch from 1965 [click here for our in-depth story on the Seiko 62MAS from 1965]. My favourite modern timepiece would be the new Seiko Astron that perfectly follows our brand idea of “Moving Ahead. Touching Hearts”.

FW: Mr. Hattori, thank you for your time.

1965 Seiko 62MAS Diver, one of Mr. Hattori's favorite historic Seiko watches

We will soon feature more Seiko novelties on Fratello Watches. Make sure to read Michael Stockton’s BaselWorld special on the new Seiko Marinemaster watches.

Vintage fashion swiss replica watches for sale

As most of our readers know by now, here at Fratello Watches we love our vintage fashion swiss replica watches. Having said that, innovation in watchmaking, usage of modern materials and even the introduction of a groundbreaking technique are all crucial things we appreciate. When companies try to combine past and present, I always look at things carefully. What might be an obvious move for the brand might not be that clear for their clients. History is important and having a rich heritage makes things easier, I guess.

In this game Longines tends to be on top in recent years. Their Legend Diver for instance was a great hit due to the friendly price and the timeless yet classic design. Careful though; releasing too many vintage-inspired pieces can deteriorate the collection and even makes it boring after a while. This year however, Longines gave us a few heritage pieces again. Undoubtedly the most prominent of these retro watches was the Longines Heritage Diver 1967. Below, an image of the original version (photo from TZ-UK’s noiseboyuk).

Longines

When looking at diver watches one can easily point out that this watch does not exactly look like a model one would pick up for diving. The big boom in diver watches came in the late 1950’s/early 1960’s when men started to explore the sea after successfully concurring air and land. We all know what the bezel on these watches is used for (measuring the time the diver has before they run out of oxygen) but chronographs were not to be seen often. This function is also important while with the help of this complication the diver could calculate his/her speed or certain underwater activities.

Longines Heritage Diver

As the name indicates this new model is inspired by a diver chronograph that Longines introduced in 1967. Being a Heritage model it shares many features with the original watch, red (or as the company calls it bordeaux) bezel being the most obvious. That makes the watch so easily noticeable, even from a distance. As a side note: let me mention that Longines sub brand, Wittnauer, also had a similar chronograph with red bezel, however both that watch and the original 1967 Longines watch were 2 register dial only watches. Interesting to see that Longines kept the sub dial at 6 o’clock of their Longines Heritage Diver watch, while the other two sub dials are silvery/white. This way, it appears to be a 2 register while upon closer inspection, there are three. Well-played.

Going back to the Longines Heritage Diver 1967, it has the size that fits me perfectly at 42mm. Because of the black dial and rather dark bezel color the best replica watch wears normal, it does not feel that huge on the wrist, on the contrary. Nice elements are the vintage shaped chronograph pushers and the subtle red cross that runs through the dial, almost barley visible. Not to mention the 2 white sub dials at 9 and 3 which – just like the original –  are different sizes and the 3 o’clock sub register being the largest.

The heart of the watch is a 27-Jewel ETA based, self-winding, column wheel chronograph, especially made for Longines. It has an impressive power reserve of 54 hours. The dial is opaline black with a touch of silver colors on the sub dials. Super LumiNova coated indexes and hands make the watch more contemporary. Being a true diver watch it is water resistance to 30 bars (300m) with the help of a screw down crown and case back. Speaking of which, a diver engraved to the case back (common adornment of that era) finishes off the reasoned design of a timepiece true to the DNA of Longines diver discount fake watches for sale. There are 3 options the potential buyer can choose from, when it comes to straps; metal bracelet, rubber strap with diving extension or a plain black crocodile strap with diving buckle.

Longines Heritage Diver 1967

Longines Heritage Diver 1967

I suppose we can agree that Longines is on the right track with their heritage watches. The timepiece is simple and elegant yet interesting and sporty at the same time. They managed to find the balance between old and new and the combination is spot on. I can encourage you to go in to an AD and try one on, as I did not too long ago. If you don’t like it there are still many marvelous piece to choose from. Price of the Longines Legend Diver 1967, $3100 USD.

King Willem-Alexander Of The Netherlands Wears A Speedmaster

By coincidence I came across the photo below, where you can see Dutch King Willem-Alexander and his wife Queen Máxima on the stand cheering for the Dutch national soccer team during the World Championship of 2010 in South-Africa. You can see Queen Máxima wearing her Rolex, which has been covered elsewhere in the past, but my eyes were drawn to the wrist of King Willem-Alexander. Although the resolution of this published ANP photo is too low to study the best fashion swiss replica watch in detail, my nose for Speedmaster spotting is rarely off. It was time to investigate.

King Willem-AlexanderMost of our readers probably know that we are based in The Netherlands. Only few will know that we are located near two of the Dutch Royal palaces. Despite that, we never saw Willem-Alexander in the flesh close enough to see what watch he was wearing. After seeing the photo above, I decided to do some digging. Last time we covered Willem-Alexander here on Fratello Watches, was in 2013 during the last Queen’s Day in The Netherlands. In that article, we showed him wearing a Rolex Datejust.

A bit of research on King Willem-Alexander resulted in a number of photos from the Live Earth Run For Water event. These photos were taken by photographer Ilja Meefout. The photos I found there were large enough to positively identify the Omega Speedmaster Professional on the wrist of King Willem-Alexander of The Netherlands. As you can see on the photos below, our King is wearing an Omega Speedmaster Pro on a leather strap with a folding clasp (which I identified on another photo, which you will find in the photo gallery below). Whether it is the standard Speedy Pro with Hesalite and a solid case back, a sapphire sandwich version or even the brown dialed Speedmaster Pro I can’t tell.

King Willem-Alexander King Willem-AlexanderI believe that King Willem-Alexander loves discount luxury watches. From a well-informed source I heard that he also bought an Omega DeVille Co-Axial, but never seen him wearing it on pictures. His grandparents, Princess Juliana and Prince Bernhard are also featured in the ‘A Journey Through Time’ book by Omega. For their marriage in 1937, Princess Juliana was given an Omega jewellery timepiece by Swiss ambassador Arthur de Pury on behalf of the Swiss Government.

What I found to be interesting, is that His Majesty The King opted for an Omega Speedmaster while he probably could have bought any model from the Patek Philippe or Vacheron Constantin collection as well. Even a Grönefeld Parallax Tourbillon probably. Perhaps he has a number of haute horlogerie pieces as well, but just favors this Omega Speedmaster Professional for wearing in public. In any case, we will probably never know but hope to see him wearing his Speedmaster Pro more often in public appearances.

King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands is not the only royal who currently wears an Omega tag heuer replica watch. Prince William of the United Kingdom is famous for wearing a mid-size Omega Seamaster 300M that he (probably) received from his mother. In the past, there have been plenty examples of Swedish and Greece Royal Family members wearing Omega watches as well.

During the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, I will pay extra attention if King Willem-Alexander will be wearing his Omega Speedmaster Professional again. If so, this article will be updated.

IWC Ingenieur Mission Earth Edition Adventure Ecology IW3236

The green production process of the fashion swiss replica watch uk sale online manufacturer in Schaffhausen, is something to be proud of. Not only IWC, but a lot of other companies seem to embrace durable entrepreneurship and corporate social responsibility. One of IWC‘s projects is to support projects like David de Rothshild‘s Plastiki Expedition. David de Rothschild and his Adventure Ecology organization built a 60 foot catamaran made entirely of plastic bottles, PET plastic and recycled waste products. With this ship, named the Plastiki, David and his carefully picked crew members will sail approx. 10,000 nautical miles across the Pacific Ocean from San Francisco to Sydney.
The name of this boat, Plastiki, was inspired by the famous Kon-Tiki expedition in 1947, lead by Thor Heyerdahl.

To ‘celebrate’ (and make some money of) this joint venture between IWC and David Rothschild, IWC launched the IWC Ingenieur Automatic Mission Earth Edition (Limited Edition). There will be 1000 pieces of this special edition Ingenieur Automatic. The Mission Earth watch has been covered here earlier this year, right after the SIHH 2009.

I have to get one thing of my chest immediately, I LOVE the fact that IWC didn’t put a transparant case back on this watch. That does NOT belong on an Ingenieur watch. I suspect that they have a stainless steel case back installed in order to get the engravings and inscriptions right, but still… A watch that is famous for its anti-magnetic construction should not be transformed into a ‘fashion’ watch.

If you take a look at the picture above (by IWC press), you will also see another neat feature. The inside of the strap has the same little shapes as the dial of the Ingenieur. Way cool! The engraving in the back is nice as well, optical finish is something you can leave to IWC for that matter. The Adventure Ecology and Plastiki inscription is very futuristic, matching perfectly by the further design and ‘joint venture’ reason of this watch.

Inside this watch ticks IWC’s inhouse caliber 80110 movement. Some people might think that this is just a de-chrono’ed ETA (Valjoux) 7750, but that’s not the case. I have written an article on that subject about a year ago which you can find by clicking here. The case of this watch has a 46mm diameter (similar to the BIG Ingenieur) and a height of 15mm.

As you can see above, the watch is very blue-ish, reminding me a bit of the Jacques Cousteau Aquatimers IWC launched in 2004. This blown-up version of the regular IWC Ingenieur ref. 3227-01 (discontinued in 2009) has two major differences in comparison to the ‘original’ IWC Ingenieur Automatic, except for the colors and the size. These are the crown guards, which were applied to the IWC Ingenieur Chronograph, but not on the regular 3227-01 version. Owning one myself, I can’t say the absence of it bothers me, but I can imagine the ‘request’ for them. The other major difference, and this is actually only easy to witness when you have the Mission Earth in your hands, is the lack of sharpness on the edges of the casing. I have held this watch in my hands during the Dutch IWC show over at Ace Jewelers, not too long ago, and this was the first difference that I noticed about the watch when holding it. Therefor, this discount luxury replica  watch has a completely different feel (at least to me).

So, in conclusion, what do I like about this watch and what’s not to like. The design is still intact despite the supersizing and the addition of crown guards. The stainless steel case back (instead of a transparant case back) is also a pro. Then of course, for the techies, the movement is a nice inhouse caliber with IWC’s Pellaton winding system. These movements are quite accurate as well, adopting IWC’s own standards for this, instead of using the more generic COSC standards.

When this best fashion swiss replica watch will be worn on a daily basis or as ‘your only watch’, the colors are a bit too much I think. I also think the blue strap could be seen as ‘looking cheap’ for many. However, to me, the major setback is the lack of sharp edges of the case. The design of this watch is so incredibly cool in my opinion, and it should feel as it looks. Sharp. And it doesn’t. If you remember my review on the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak 15300 that I wrote recently, you know how much I care about the ‘feel’ of watches with a design like these.

With a list price of a mere 9K USD and the fact that there are some cons about this watch, I am happy that I have the discontinued (that has been produced from 2005 till now) 3227-01 model. A tribute to the original SL1832 Ingenieur in my opinion, without losing its own identity. It is cheaper too, and I really don’t see why the Mission Earth has to cost more. It makes no sense to me.

7 Personalized Watches Made for World Champion Athletes

With baseball season heating up and the NBA and NHL finals underway, we at WatchTime thought it would be the perfect time to re-post (with a few updates) our article on the elite fraternity of athletes who have not only won a world championship in their sports but also boast a watch made specifically for them. Here are seven notable watches of champions.

Randy “The Big Unit” Johnson won baseball’s World Series with the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2001. A longtime watch lover, particularly of the Ulysse Nardin Freak, Johnson partnered with Ulysse Nardin in 2012 to create the limited-edition Big Unit Chronograph. The personalized watch has a tiny baseball as the counterweight of the central seconds hand, and Johnson’s number “51″ replaces the typical “50″ minute marker on the bezel. Each luxury swiss world uk watches replica is delivered with a baseball autographed by Johnson.

Ulysse Nardin Big Unit Chronograph with baseball autographed by Johnson.

The L.A. Lakers’ Kobe Bryant, who has won multiple NBA championships, is nicknamed “Black Mamba” for his slippery, on-court athleticism, “Black Mamba” is also the nickname of his personal Hublot King Power wristwatch, which has a purple-and-gold Lakers color scheme on the dial’s hands, indices and numerals; a Kobe Bryant signature in gold on the sapphire caseback; and a python leather strap. The Hublot King Power Black Mamba is limited to 250 pieces. For more on the watch, click here.

Kobe Bryant and the Hublot King Power Black Mamba

Spanish tennis star Rafael Nadal stands out even among this elite group of champions in that he is the only one who actually wears his watch while winning titles. And not just any fashion swiss replica watch uk sale online: a six-figure tourbillon timepiece from Richard Mille. The brand created its RM 027-01 Tourbillon specifically for Nadal, and with his creative input. Its ultra-lightweight case is made of an anthracite polymer injected with carbon nanotubes and the movement is made of a light, rigid, shock-absorbent combo of titanium and a lithium alloy called LITHAL.

Rafael Nadal and his watch, the Richard Mille RM27-01 Tourbillon

Richard Mille RM27-01 Tourbillon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boxing legend Muhammad Ali is an elder statesman of his sport now, but in his heyday the three-time world heavyweight champ was one of the most famous athletes in the world. IWC Schaffhausen recognized Ali’s legend with its creation of the one-of-a-kind IWC Big Pilot’s Watch Edition Muhammad Ali. Modeled on IWC’s historic Big Pilot’s Watch, this unique piece has applied indices with a Super-LumiNova coating in signal red, a favorite color of Ali’s, and a matching color scheme on the underside of the black alligator strap. The caseback is engraved with Ali’s signature and the inscription, “Edition Muhammad Ali, ONE OUT OF ONE.” It was auctioned for $60,000 at Ali’s Celebrity Fight Night Gala in April 2012.

IWC Big Pilot Muhammad Ali

IWC Big Pilot Muhammad Ali - backNew York Giants quarterback Eli Manning — who bested Movado endorser Tom Brady of the New England Patriots in not one but two thrilling Super Bowls — is a proud Citizen wearer and even appears in TV commercials for the Japanese brand. In 2012, Citizen released a personalized Manning watch, the Citizen Eli Manning Limited Edition Perpetual Chrono A.T, which featured a dial in Giants blue and was limited to 2,000 pieces. The watch has a 42-mm case and a quartz movement with Citizen’s signature Eco-Drive technology, which uses sunlight to recharge the battery. Its numerous functions include a 60-minute chronograph, perpetual calendar, alarm, and power reserve and AM/PM indicators. The steel caseback is engraved with Manning’s Giants jersey number “10.” Click here for more about the watch.

Eli Manning wearing Citizen Limited Edition Perpetual Chrono A.T

Citizen Limited Edition Perpetual Chrono A.T

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was probably inevitable that former Miami Heat all-star and two-time NBA champ LeBron James (who this season returned to his hometown Cleveland Cavaliers) would eventually join the fraternity of athletes with their own personal best quaslity swiss replica watch models. In fall of 2013, Audemars Piguet launched the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore LeBron James, a relatively understated chronograph with a rose-gold/titanium combo case and an elegant gray leather strap. The only touch of “bling” is a subtle one, namely the diamond-set chrono push-piece at 2 o’clock. The Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Ofshore LeBron James is a limited edition of 600, priced at $51,500. You can read more about it here.

Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore LeBron James - front

LeBron James wearing Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore LeBron James

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recently retired New York Yankees all-star shortstop (and five-time World Series champ) Derek Jeter collaborated with Movado on the design of its Derek Jeter Captain Series watches. This one is sporty version of Movado’s famous Museum Watch, with a 42-mm stainless steel case finished in black PVD. The matte black dial has a polished black dot at 12 o’clock, a date display in a round window at 6 o’clock, blue-filled hour and minute hands, and a thin, gray vertical-stripes motif (somewhat reminiscent of the iconic Yankee uniform pinstripes). The central seconds hand and the reflector ring surrounding the dial are also blue. The aaa grade swiss replica watch is powered by a Swiss quartz movement and comes on a black, perforated rubber strap with a stainless steel, black-PVD-finished tongue buckle. The price is $795. Click here for more on the Movado Derek Jeter Captain Series watches.

Movado Derek Jeter Captain Series Museum SportAre there other world champion athletes with their own watches that we’re missing? Let us know in the comments box below; we’ll be updating the list frequently.

How To Buy Vintage Replica Watches

As noted in my previous article about buying pre-owned watches, the market for truly “vintage” watches is something quite different from that for relatively young “pre-owned” watches. Any replica watch made before 1990 could be considered vintage, although some collectors put the maximum year of “vintage” at 1980 or even earlier. I’d like to use 1990 as the baseline for this article, which offers my tips on buying vintage watches, but in the end you’ll have to decide for yourself whether a given watch is old enough for you to qualify it as “vintage.”

There are two very important questions to consider when it comes to buying vintage watches:

• Can you and do you trust the seller of the watch?

Does the seller has a good reputation when it comes to selling classic vintage replica watches? Investigate! There are enough forums, Facebook groups and blogs out there that might have mentioned the seller in a positive — or negative — manner. Although it might sound cliché, also learn to trust your gut feelings. If the purchase doesn’t feel good or legit, let it go, and rest assured that another nice vintage piece will come along.

• Have you gained as much knowledge as you can on the watch you want to buy?

Reading WatchTime and WatchTime.com is always an excellent source of info (of course)! But also take a look at other partner watch blogs like Watch-Insider, Fratello Watches and so on. There is quite a bit of coverage out there on vintage watches. Google is your best friend if you’re just starting out. Sometimes you will find relatively small websites that specialize in just one brand or even one model, and these can be gems. An example is this website on vintage Omega Constellation watches. A truly amazing source of information, and all for free. And along with websites, we also have these old-fashioned things called books. Don’t forget about those.

Vintage Omega Constellation watches

The publisher Mondani has done a good job on documenting Rolex watches, but the recently released book on Speedmaster watches (by WatchPrint), Moonwatch Only sets new standards. Books such as these may seem expensive, but they can prevent you from making mistakes that will cost you a fortune later. Read here why you should invest in a good book on watches. In the WatchTime Shop, you will find a selection of available titles that might be of use as well. Another interesting source of information are the auction-house websites and catalogs.

Rolex watches book

Beyond all that, there are a few other things to consider, some of which I addressed in my article on pre-owned watches in general. On the next page, I will address them specifically for vintage watches:

Service history

Don’t expect invoices from the 1950s and 1960s to be included in the sale. I assume your parents or grandparents don’t have these anymore either, do they? It is important that a vintage discount fake  watch is technically in good working order. If not, you can go through hell with regards to the availability (and prices!) of spare parts. It can be a long road. I had to wait for over a year on a silly movement part for one of my 1950s Omegas. Some watchmakers are able to reproduce the parts themselves, or reuse something from another movement. It would be best if the watch is serviced at the manufacture, but having receipts from a good watchmaker will also do the job — as long as there is some kind of proof that the watch has been taken care of.

Longines Vintage watch

Box and papers

If a watch is 30 or 40 years old, it is quite common that its original boxes and manuals are gone. If possible, make sure to get the correct box for your watch. It should match the actual watch or at least be period-correct. Through the years, some watch brands used different boxes for their watches. Some brands can supply you with information on the correct boxes and manuals.

One more topic I would mention is “provenance.” Be very careful when a watch seller offers you items that speak to a watch’s provenance in order to prove to you that it is authentic. These may include photos of people wearing the watch to napkins with the signature of the first owner. I’m not joking here, unfortunately. Only real provenance counts. Acceptable items include invoices with mention of the correct serial number and/or movement number and the work performed on the watch, as well as original, stamped papers and warranty cards. Do not pay a premium for items that look fishy or have the slightest signs of being fabricated to make a sale.

Vintage Tudor watch

So what are the best places to find some of these beautiful timepieces? I’m glad you asked. Keep reading.

I have left out one of the most obvious sources — watch auctions — as I have covered that topic in detail elsewhere previously.

• Watch Dealers

Yes, this is another obvious one. Many of these have websites where they list their stock, or use websites like Chrono24 to display their stock. Either way, if they don’t have a website and are not close to you to visit, it becomes troublesome. Make sure to get into a daily or weekly routine in which you visit the websites of these watch sellers so you won’t miss out on the “incoming” watches they have. There are some awesome websites, such as www.subgmt.com, which specialize in specific brands and have a great reputation. Make sure to bookmark them and work your way through them. Descriptions and good(repeat: good) photos are key. I’d rather see a picture that doesn’t have the best composition, or beautiful surroundings, but instead shows all the minor details and essentially the watch “as is.” Nowadays, some dealers are nowadays also show their stock on Instagram, so make sure to follow them there, too.

Vintage watches on table

• Watch Forums

I’ve found some of my best timepieces by using watch forums. Most watch forums, like www.watchuseek.com and www.omegaforums.net, have a “sales forum” on which their members can offer their watches. The latter offers not only vintage Omega watches but also a bunch of other brands. Since you are probably dealing with private sellers, please re-read part 1 of this article again to know what you should pay attention to. The great thing about forums is that the prices tend to be more tempting than those offered by watch dealers. Keep in mind that private sellers rarely offer a warranty, so you have to be sure what you are buying. That task can be tackled by checking the posts about these sellers on the forums that offer the watches. Is it a guy who seem to have a good reputation, a good knowledge of the subject, and so on? Do a check!

• Watch Fairs / Trade Shows

As you might be able to tell by my use of the English language, I am not from the U.S.A. So I can’t speak for the watch fairs over there. However, the watch fairs here in Europe (mainly in Germany) are great sources for vintage watches. The only drawback is that you have to decide on the spot to purchase, and do all the checks on the spot as well. Don’t let the seller rush you and ask for his business card when you want to have some time to think it over or do some online checking. Take pictures of the fashion swiss replica watches uk sale online with your phone. In any case, always ask for warranty (or at least return policy) when you buy at these fairs. Most of the dealers are professionals that use these fairs to sell their stock but also to buy new watches themselves (they often have an hour ahead of the opening time to do their own “shopping”). There are several overviews available that will let you know about watch fairs nearby. Click here for an overview in Europe, here for an overview in the U.S.A.

Watch fair crowd

• Facebook Groups

There are a couple of groups on Facebook where watches are being offered. Is this Marketplace 2.0? Perhaps not, but it is a very efficient (and free) way to advertise for someone who wants to sell his or her watch. Most of these groups are not open to public, so you have to request membership. This is mainly due to privacy/security reasons. Just go to Facebook and search for Watch Sales or similar phrases. You might find a local group in your region or country where vintage watches are being offered.

• Private Sellers / Classifieds

The ideal scenario would be for a seller to find YOU when he wants to sell a watch. In such cases, these sellers need the money and you will get the best price. However, that’s not very likely to happen if you don’t make yourself known to other watch collectors. When you are active on forums or on watch-related Facebook groups and let people know what kind of vintage clone watches you are into, you are bound to be offered something sooner or later. My rule of thumb is: if you actively search for a watch, you will pay the highest price. If people come to you to offer their watch, you get the best price.

Vintage Hanhart watch - 1938

Next week I will introduce you to some interesting vintage watch brands and models which you probably haven’t give much thought to yet. As a preview, check out this beautiful vintage Tissot Navigator Yachting.